Repertoire

“A Concert of Concertos”

October 4
14 €, 18 €
Start of the Event: 6.30 pm

Lithuanian State Symphony Orchestra
Artistic Director and Chief Conductor Gintaras Rinkevičius

Soloists: Rolandas Romoslauskas (viola), Povilas Jacunskas (cello), Gintaras Januševičius (piano, Lithuania / Germany)

Conductor Mārtiņš Ozoliņš (Latvia)

Programme: Sergei Prokofiev, Zita Bružaitė, George Gershwin



As many as three different concertos performed by three outstanding Lithuanian soloists and the Lithuanian State Symphony Orchestra will form the framework of this programme titled as “A Concert of Concertos.” The idea to devise such a programme was proposed by the LSSO’s artistic director and chief conductor, Gintaras Rinkevičius, who, on this special occasion, will give way on the conductor’s pulpit to Mārtiņš Ozoliņš, chief conductor of the Latvian National Opera. Playing solo with the orchestra in Zita Bružaitė’s Viola Concerto Awakening and Sergei Prokofiev’s Sinfonia Concertante for cello and orchestra will be the leaders of the orchestra’s viola and cello sections, Rolandas Romoslauskas and Povilas Jacunskas.

According to Bružaitė, “the foundation of this work lies not in the modern sonorities, diverse methods or sources of sound production, which characterize the modernist sound, but in the communion between the capering, brooding, singing viola and the orchestra, which in effect blurs the boundaries between serious art music and somewhat lighter genres.”

Symphony-Concerto in E minor (1952) for cello and orchestra, more commonly referred to as Sinfonia Concertante, is one of Prokofiev’s final completed works that was for a long time considered unplayable. “This work is really important to me; I like it very much, indeed. Even though it is quite an easy-listening piece for the audience, the music is formidably complicated, posing many technical challenges to the performer,” Jacunskas asserts.

Lithuanian-born pianist Gintaras Januševičius, who has currently made Hannover his second home, is known to have a knack for experimentation with the formats of presentation. Thus his every appearance is imbued with a spirit of adventure: he is always very keen to look for unusual venues and frameworks wherein to present less known musical works, or find a different key to the well-known staple pieces. At the “Music of Changes” festival he will perform the legendary Concerto in F (1925) by George Gershwin. Walter Damrosch, a commissioner and first conductor of the concerto, praised the work in the following lines: “Lady Jazz... has danced her way around the world... but for all her travels and sweeping popularity, she has encountered no knight who could lift her to a level that would enable her to be received as a respectable member of musical circles. George Gershwin seems to have accomplished this miracle... boldly by dressing his extremely independent and up-to-date young lady in the classic garb of a concerto. ... He is the Prince who has taken Cinderella by the hand and openly proclaimed her a princess to the astonished world, no doubt to the fury of her envious sisters.”